THE SOULS OF THE NAVAJO

Dana

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Daniel Siebert


I puffed mildly on some of my homegrown leaves. They started to work, and I realized that this little experiment could turn into something greater. I was about 85% agile and alert when I loaded a 2 foot waterpipe with pinky-nail sized pile of 5X. At about 75% agility, I slowly "rolled" through the air onto my floor. The deep burgundy and paisley oriental rug was the last thing I saw. I sat upright, took the hit, and let the body be very powerfully reclined. This time--instead of lying in a hammock, or on a couch or bed--the stone floor became an integral part of the experience. When the gravity tug became even more powerful, there was nowhere for my body to go--nothing to shift or relocate--every nook and cranny of my body relaxed and touched the floor...then I just "became" the red-padded stone floor.

It was after this enchantment with "being the ground" that the curtain raised and I found myself lying on a conveyor belt, feet first, moving forward as slow as Salvia usually is. Above me were these multi-colored ram horn looking things that had a bit of specularity and were variegated with two vibrant colors each (yellow with red lines, green with turquoise, etc.), gradually diminishing into space above me. These, as I was being told, were the "souls of the Navajo" and it seemed that I was being passed underneath them to be judged, or even to be their entertainment, as they seemed pretty cheery. Of course my description does nothing to convey the utter vibrancy and visual life of these horns.

Then the laughter hit, which pretty much ended the trip. I laughed for about 3 minutes until my face was covered in tears. I couldn't believe that I was invited to their "ritual". It was like I had read about it sober in the news or seen it on TV, like the Macy's parade or something. But this time I was actually in the procession, being passed through the viewers and being taught how to render in art - the souls of the Navajo.